Divan Ilmaz first class (with bag)

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Baglama is the most commonly used string folk instrument in Turkey. It takes different names according to the regions and according to its size such as Baglama, Divan Sazi, Bozuk, Çögür, Kopuz Irizva, Cura, Tambura, etc. Cura is the smallest member of the baglama family with the highest pitched sound. The member one size bigger than cura which gives a sound that is one octave lower than cura is the tambura. And the one with the deepest sound is the Divan sazi whose sound is one octave lower compared to tambura. Baglama has three main parts called Tekne, Gögüs and Sap. Tekne part is generally made from mulberry trees as well as from woods of juniper, beech, spruce or walnut. The gögüs part is made from spruce and the sap section from homespun or juniper. There are pieces called burgu (screw) at the end of the sap which is opposite to tekne part to which the strings are tied. These screws are used for tuning. There are pitches on the sap tied with fish line. Baglama is played with a Mizrap or Tezene made from cherry wood bark or plastic and fingers are used in some regions. The later technique is called Selpe.

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SettingsDivan Ilmaz first class (with bag) removeTanbur Master Khalil (Moaragh) removesetar Master khalil (Mosaic model) removeTar Nasl Jadid removeSETAR MOSHTAGH removeTanbur Master Khalil remove
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ContentBaglama is the most commonly used string folk instrument in Turkey. It takes different names according to the regions and according to its size such as Baglama, Divan Sazi, Bozuk, Çögür, Kopuz Irizva, Cura, Tambura, etc. Cura is the smallest member of the baglama family with the highest pitched sound. The member one size bigger than cura which gives a sound that is one octave lower than cura is the tambura. And the one with the deepest sound is the Divan sazi whose sound is one octave lower compared to tambura. Baglama has three main parts called Tekne, Gögüs and Sap. Tekne part is generally made from mulberry trees as well as from woods of juniper, beech, spruce or walnut. The gögüs part is made from spruce and the sap section from homespun or juniper. There are pieces called burgu (screw) at the end of the sap which is opposite to tekne part to which the strings are tied. These screws are used for tuning. There are pitches on the sap tied with fish line. Baglama is played with a Mizrap or Tezene made from cherry wood bark or plastic and fingers are used in some regions. The later technique is called Selpe.
Seyed Khalil Alinezhad was a great master of the spiritual instrument tanbur, recognized as one of the best tanbur players ever known. Seyed Khalil was born in a Kurdish family in a Sahneh County village in the Kermanshah Province, in western Iran. He started his tanbur lessons with Seyed Nader Taheri and followed his studies under supervisions of Seyed Amrollah Shah Ebrahimi, Dervish Amir Hayati, and Master Abedin Khademi. He finished his academic studies in the 1970s from University of Tehran with a thesis titled “Tanbur – from the very beginning till now”. During his lifetime he became known as a spiritual leader of the mystic religion Ahl-e Haqq (People of truth), a religious tradition related to Sufism, Shia Islam, and Alevi traditions.
Mohammad Omar Khalil (b. 1936), a painter, master printmaker and mentor, practicing since the 1960s, is one of the most significant artists of his generation from Sudan and the Arab world. A long overdue celebration of his life’s work, Homeland Under My Nails, is the first major UK solo exhibition of his work.Persian tar is a long necked, double-bowl body instrument. Persian Tar is a string or stringed instrument. It is the newest musical instrument of Persian folklor. It only dates back to 250 years ago. It's current form was developed in the 18th century. Iranians say that Tar is the sultan of instruments. It is strongly believed that Tar is the descendent of rubab which is played in Pakistan and Afghanistan. After is has been adopted to Persian art by the musicians it became a common urban instrument. The long and narrow neck of Tar has a flat fingerboard which ends with six wooden pegs. It has three courses of double "singing" strings which lies on the fingerboard There are also two pairs of shorter strings which is under the bass and over two small copper bridges on the upper side of the fingerboard. Tuning of these strings are variable according to the performer's taste.The setar is a Persian (Iranian) stringed instrument with a small, pear-shaped soundbox and four metal strings. Its name means “three strings.” A fourth drone string was added about 150 years ago by the mystic Moshtagh Ali Shah. The drone string is referred to as the “Sim Moshtagh” (Moshtagh string) by many prominent tar and setar players. This modification gave the delicate instrument a “bigger” sound and more complex tuning possibilities. The resonating box of the setar is attached to a long neck that has twenty-five gut frets. The soundbox is made from mulberry wood, while the neck comes from the walnut tree. The instrument has a melodic range of just over twenty scale degrees. Although it is traditionally played with the right index finger’s nail, in the past three decades, two distinguished master performers, Mohammad-Reza Lotfi and Hossein Alizadeh, have introduced new techniques to give setar playing a whole new life. The tanbur is an ancient instrument that has assumed various shapes and sounds over the centuries. The simple sonority of this instrument, alternating between dry and soft, has something immaterial, abstract, and even ascetic about it that renders it suitable for spiritual music. In Iran, the tanbur was among the instruments that were played in the Sassanid court. Later, certain Kurdish religious groups adopted it as a sacred instrument and have been using it ever since to accompany their sacred hymns and ceremonial dances.
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