-1%

Santor Three Mohr Mosavi Special

$858.00
$848.00

10 in stock

10 in stock

Description

The Santoor is an Instrument with approximately 100 strings which originated in the Himalayan Valley of Kashmir. Originally known as “Shata Tantri Veena” (Sanskrit version of one hundred strings), which has close relatives in British and American “Hammer Dulcimer”, Chinese “Yang Chin” and the east European “Cimbalom”. Santoor, which originated from Vedic “Vana Veena”, is characteristic of Kashmir Valley and is neither seen or played any where played. The “Vana Veena” also had strings and was played with sticks. In the orient the fundamentals of this instrument is no doubt very ancient. It seems that the origin goes back to Assyrians and Babylonians. An instrument, which at the same breath could give the audiences a feel of melody and rhythm naturally, had much to offer in terms of musicality. The emergence of Santoor as a popular Indian classical instrument has of course been due to the presence of stalwart Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma. However, its roots are necessarily from the Durbars of Sufi heretics of Kashmir, where its folk origins were interspersed with Hindustani classical music.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Santor Three Mohr Mosavi Special”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Quick Comparison

SettingsSantor Three Mohr Mosavi Special removesetar Master khalil (Mosaic model) removesetar nori removeSetar Azizi (Special) removeSETAR MOSHTAGH removeTanbur Majzob (Throat 3stamp) remove
Image
SKU
Rating
Price

$858.00
$848.00

$153.00
$143.00

$63.00
$53.00

Free

$530.00
$520.00

$182.00
$172.00

Stock

10 in stock

3 in stock

Out of stock

2 in stock

Availability10 in stock3 in stockOut of stock2 in stock
Add to cart

Description
ContentThe Santoor is an Instrument with approximately 100 strings which originated in the Himalayan Valley of Kashmir. Originally known as “Shata Tantri Veena” (Sanskrit version of one hundred strings), which has close relatives in British and American “Hammer Dulcimer”, Chinese “Yang Chin” and the east European “Cimbalom”. Santoor, which originated from Vedic “Vana Veena”, is characteristic of Kashmir Valley and is neither seen or played any where played. The “Vana Veena” also had strings and was played with sticks. In the orient the fundamentals of this instrument is no doubt very ancient. It seems that the origin goes back to Assyrians and Babylonians. An instrument, which at the same breath could give the audiences a feel of melody and rhythm naturally, had much to offer in terms of musicality. The emergence of Santoor as a popular Indian classical instrument has of course been due to the presence of stalwart Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma. However, its roots are necessarily from the Durbars of Sufi heretics of Kashmir, where its folk origins were interspersed with Hindustani classical music.Mohammad Omar Khalil (b. 1936), a painter, master printmaker and mentor, practicing since the 1960s, is one of the most significant artists of his generation from Sudan and the Arab world. A long overdue celebration of his life’s work, Homeland Under My Nails, is the first major UK solo exhibition of his work.The Setar, also spelled and romanized as Setaar or Setâr, is an Iranian musical instrument. It is a member of the lute family, which is played with the index finger of the right hand. Two and a half centuries ago, the fourth string was added to the setar which most of the time has the same tone as the bass string.The setar is a Persian (Iranian) stringed instrument with a small, pear-shaped soundbox and four metal strings. Its name means “three strings.” A fourth drone string was added about 150 years ago by the mystic Moshtagh Ali Shah. The drone string is referred to as the “Sim Moshtagh” (Moshtagh string) by many prominent tar and setar players. This modification gave the delicate instrument a “bigger” sound and more complex tuning possibilities. The resonating box of the setar is attached to a long neck that has twenty-five gut frets. The soundbox is made from mulberry wood, while the neck comes from the walnut tree. The instrument has a melodic range of just over twenty scale degrees. Although it is traditionally played with the right index finger’s nail, in the past three decades, two distinguished master performers, Mohammad-Reza Lotfi and Hossein Alizadeh, have introduced new techniques to give setar playing a whole new life. Tanbur has epic, mythical and mystical characteristics and it is often used to accompany the narration of epics. This instrument has traveled far and wide in time and space and it has taken on different names and shapes. The neck and body of Tanbur is one whole piece similar to Setar. Between 10 to 15 frets are placed on Tanbur. Iranian Tanbur has 4 strings and as mentioned before is played without a pick. Based on 3 statues found in the ruins of Shoosh, Tanbur can be dated back to 1500 B.C. Persian Tanbur travelled through Iran and Syria to Turkey and Greece and further west to Egypt. The Egyptian version has an elliptical body. It is known that Tanbur was widely used during the Sasanid dynasty and even before that. Today, Tanbur is used in mystical circles to accompany the Darvishes’ chants and mantras and is usually accompanied by Daf on such occasions.
Weight
DimensionsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Additional information
Select the fields to be shown. Others will be hidden. Drag and drop to rearrange the order.
  • Image
  • SKU
  • Rating
  • Price
  • Stock
  • Availability
  • Add to cart
  • Description
  • Content
  • Weight
  • Dimensions
  • Additional information
  • Attributes
  • Custom attributes
  • Custom fields
Click outside to hide the comparison bar
Compare