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Tanbur Majzob A simple wick of a seal

$860.00
$850.00

10 in stock

10 in stock

Description

The tanbur is plucked string instrument. It has two strings and because of this it is also called dotar (“do” means two in Persian and “tar” means string). However, in the province of Kerman Shah it is called tanbur and has three strings. The best documents about the history of this instrument are the paintings and descriptions in Farabi’s Musiqi al-Kabir (950 ). In this book, Farabi mentions the two kinds of tanbur; the tanbur of Khorasan and the tanbur of Baqdad. In Persia, there are eight different kinds of tanbur with different sound characteristics. They are: The tanbur of the eastern Khorasan, the Turkish tanbur of the Northern Khorasan, the Kormanji tanbur of the Northern Khorasan, the tanbur of Eastern Khorasan, the tanbur of Turkmen Sahara , the tanbur of Mazandaran, the Taleshi tanbur, and the tanbur of Kermanshah. The tanbur of the eastern Khorasan has the biggest sound box or bowl, and the Taleshi tanbur has the smallest sound box. The style of playing the tanbur is mostly similar in all different regions, but the personal styles and techniques of the players plus the different physical shapes of the different tanburs cause some differences in the produced sounds of these different tanburs. The most well- known tanbur players are: Hussein Samandari, Abdollah Sorur Ahmadi from the eastern Khorasan. Mohammad Hussein Yeganeh, Haj Gorban Solaymani, and Olya Qoli Yeghaneh of the Northern Khorasan. Nazarli Mahjubi from the Turkmen Sahara and Mohammad Reza Eshaqi from Mazandaran. Darvish Amir Hayati, Baba Qolam, and Amrollah Ebrahimi from the province of Kermanshah.

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ContentThe tanbur is plucked string instrument. It has two strings and because of this it is also called dotar (“do” means two in Persian and “tar” means string). However, in the province of Kerman Shah it is called tanbur and has three strings. The best documents about the history of this instrument are the paintings and descriptions in Farabi’s Musiqi al-Kabir (950 ). In this book, Farabi mentions the two kinds of tanbur; the tanbur of Khorasan and the tanbur of Baqdad. In Persia, there are eight different kinds of tanbur with different sound characteristics. They are: The tanbur of the eastern Khorasan, the Turkish tanbur of the Northern Khorasan, the Kormanji tanbur of the Northern Khorasan, the tanbur of Eastern Khorasan, the tanbur of Turkmen Sahara , the tanbur of Mazandaran, the Taleshi tanbur, and the tanbur of Kermanshah. The tanbur of the eastern Khorasan has the biggest sound box or bowl, and the Taleshi tanbur has the smallest sound box. The style of playing the tanbur is mostly similar in all different regions, but the personal styles and techniques of the players plus the different physical shapes of the different tanburs cause some differences in the produced sounds of these different tanburs. The most well- known tanbur players are: Hussein Samandari, Abdollah Sorur Ahmadi from the eastern Khorasan. Mohammad Hussein Yeganeh, Haj Gorban Solaymani, and Olya Qoli Yeghaneh of the Northern Khorasan. Nazarli Mahjubi from the Turkmen Sahara and Mohammad Reza Eshaqi from Mazandaran. Darvish Amir Hayati, Baba Qolam, and Amrollah Ebrahimi from the province of Kermanshah.Persian tar is a long necked, double-bowl body instrument. Persian Tar is a string or stringed instrument. It is the newest musical instrument of Persian folklor. It only dates back to 250 years ago. It's current form was developed in the 18th century. Iranians say that Tar is the sultan of instruments. It is strongly believed that Tar is the descendent of rubab which is played in Pakistan and Afghanistan. After is has been adopted to Persian art by the musicians it became a common urban instrument. The long and narrow neck of Tar has a flat fingerboard which ends with six wooden pegs. It has three courses of double "singing" strings which lies on the fingerboard There are also two pairs of shorter strings which is under the bass and over two small copper bridges on the upper side of the fingerboard. Tuning of these strings are variable according to the performer's taste.

Persian Setar Instrument

Setar is one of the string instruments of Iranian music that is played with the fingernail of the right hand. Setar has 4 strings made of steel and bronze. In Iranian instrumental music, the use of the setar is very common. Persian Setar Previously had three strings but now it has four strings. The Persian setar bowl is usually made of mulberry or walnut wood. Persian Setar Instrument has a delicate sound and has a direct connection with the musician’s nerves and psyche, and therefore the setar is often called the companion of solitary times. Setar Instrument  is one of the most widely used and popular instruments in Iranian original music and many musicians have turned to it. ShopiPersia is the largest sales reference for Iranian musical instruments. We ship worldwide. Experience the joy of online shopping with us.
The Setar, also spelled and romanized as Setaar or Setâr, is an Iranian musical instrument. It is a member of the lute family, which is played with the index finger of the right hand. Two and a half centuries ago, the fourth string was added to the setar which most of the time has the same tone as the bass string.Albumin is an appealing carrier in nanomedicine because of its unique features. First, it is the most abundant protein in plasma, endowing high biocompatibility, biodegradability, nonimmunogenicity, and safety for its clinical application. Second, albumin chemical structure and conformation allows interaction with many different drugs, potentially protecting them from elimination and metabolism in vivo, thus improving their pharmacokinetic properties. Finally, albumin can interact with receptors overexpressed in many diseased tissues and cells, providing a unique feature for active targeting of the disease site without the addition of specific ligands to the nanocarrier. For this reason, albumin, characterized by an extended serum half-life of around 19 days, has the potential of promoting half-life extension and targeted delivery of drugs. Therefore, this article focuses on the importance of albumin as a nanodrug delivery carrier for hydrophobic drugs, taking advantage of the passive as well as active targeting potential of this nanocarrier. Particular attention is paid to the breakthrough NAB-Technology, with emphasis on the advantages of Nab-Paclitaxel (Abraxane), compared to the solvent-based formulations of Paclitaxel, i.e., CrEL-paclitaxel (Taxol) in a clinical setting. Finally, the role of albumin in carrying anticancer compounds is depicted, with a particular focus on the albumin-based formulations that are currently undergoing clinical trials. The article sheds light on the power of an endogenous substance, such as albumin, as a drug delivery system, signifies the importance of the drug vehicle in drug performance in the biological systems, and highlights the possible future trends in the use of this drug delivery system.Persian tar is a long necked, double-bowl body instrument. Persian Tar is a string or stringed instrument. It is the newest musical instrument of Persian folklor. It only dates back to 250 years ago. It's current form was developed in the 18th century. Iranians say that Tar is the sultan of instruments. It is strongly believed that Tar is the descendent of rubab which is played in Pakistan and Afghanistan. After is has been adopted to Persian art by the musicians it became a common urban instrument. The long and narrow neck of Tar has a flat fingerboard which ends with six wooden pegs. It has three courses of double "singing" strings which lies on the fingerboard There are also two pairs of shorter strings which is under the bass and over two small copper bridges on the upper side of the fingerboard. Tuning of these strings are variable according to the performer's taste.
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