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Tanbur Mehrab one piece

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ṭanbūr, also spelled ṭambūr, long-necked fretted lute played under various names from the Balkans to northwestern Asia. Resembling the long lutes of ancient Egypt and Babylon as well as the ancient Greek pandoura, it has a deep pear-shaped body, some 1 to 4 dozen adjustable frets, and 2 to 10 metal strings that are typically arranged in single, double, or triple courses. The strings are variously fastened with front and side tuning pegs, typically without a pegbox. The ṭanbūr has remained popular since medieval times. Among its most obvious derivatives are the Greek bouzouki, the Balkan tambura and tamburitza (or tamburica), and the Persian setār. The Indian tambura resembles the ṭanbūr in many respects and, although probably an adaptation of it, is notably a fretless drone (as opposed to melody) instrument. Perhaps also derived from the ṭanbūr—and linguistically linked to the setār—is the Indian sitar.

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Contentṭanbūr, also spelled ṭambūr, long-necked fretted lute played under various names from the Balkans to northwestern Asia. Resembling the long lutes of ancient Egypt and Babylon as well as the ancient Greek pandoura, it has a deep pear-shaped body, some 1 to 4 dozen adjustable frets, and 2 to 10 metal strings that are typically arranged in single, double, or triple courses. The strings are variously fastened with front and side tuning pegs, typically without a pegbox. The ṭanbūr has remained popular since medieval times. Among its most obvious derivatives are the Greek bouzouki, the Balkan tambura and tamburitza (or tamburica), and the Persian setār. The Indian tambura resembles the ṭanbūr in many respects and, although probably an adaptation of it, is notably a fretless drone (as opposed to melody) instrument. Perhaps also derived from the ṭanbūr—and linguistically linked to the setār—is the Indian sitar.Persian tar is a long necked, double-bowl body instrument. Persian Tar is a string or stringed instrument. It is the newest musical instrument of Persian folklor. It only dates back to 250 years ago. It's current form was developed in the 18th century. Iranians say that Tar is the sultan of instruments. It is strongly believed that Tar is the descendent of rubab which is played in Pakistan and Afghanistan. After is has been adopted to Persian art by the musicians it became a common urban instrument. The long and narrow neck of Tar has a flat fingerboard which ends with six wooden pegs. It has three courses of double "singing" strings which lies on the fingerboard There are also two pairs of shorter strings which is under the bass and over two small copper bridges on the upper side of the fingerboard. Tuning of these strings are variable according to the performer's taste.Setar Hamraz Berry bowl Walnut bunch Berry pageThe Setar, also spelled and romanized as Setaar or Setâr, is an Iranian musical instrument. It is a member of the lute family, which is played with the index finger of the right hand. Two and a half centuries ago, the fourth string was added to the setar which most of the time has the same tone as the bass string.Setar is a string or stringed instrument. In these musical instruments a stretched vibrating string produces the initial sound. They are called Chordophones as well. "Setâr" consists of "Se" and "Târ". The word "Târ" means string and the word "Se" means three in Persian and for this reason "Setâr" means a stringed instrument with three strings. Setar is a plucked string instrument and and the right index finger nail is used as a plectrum to pluck or strum the instrument. Setar is a fretted string instrument, thus the instrument has frets that have been tied on the neck. Setar is one of the main instruments of Persian art music.Persian tar is a long necked, double-bowl body instrument. Persian Tar is a string or stringed instrument. It is the newest musical instrument of Persian folklor. It only dates back to 250 years ago. It's current form was developed in the 18th century. Iranians say that Tar is the sultan of instruments. It is strongly believed that Tar is the descendent of rubab which is played in Pakistan and Afghanistan. After is has been adopted to Persian art by the musicians it became a common urban instrument. The long and narrow neck of Tar has a flat fingerboard which ends with six wooden pegs. It has three courses of double "singing" strings which lies on the fingerboard There are also two pairs of shorter strings which is under the bass and over two small copper bridges on the upper side of the fingerboard. Tuning of these strings are variable according to the performer's taste.
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