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Tar Mohammad Hatami

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Persian tar is a long necked, double-bowl body instrument. Persian Tar is a string or stringed instrument. It is the newest musical instrument of Persian folklor. It only dates back to 250 years ago. It’s current form was developed in the 18th century. Iranians say that Tar is the sultan of instruments. It is strongly believed that Tar is the descendent of rubab which is played in Pakistan and Afghanistan. After is has been adopted to Persian art by the musicians it became a common urban instrument. The long and narrow neck of Tar has a flat fingerboard which ends with six wooden pegs. It has three courses of double “singing” strings which lies on the fingerboard There are also two pairs of shorter strings which is under the bass and over two small copper bridges on the upper side of the fingerboard. Tuning of these strings are variable according to the performer’s taste.

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ContentPersian tar is a long necked, double-bowl body instrument. Persian Tar is a string or stringed instrument. It is the newest musical instrument of Persian folklor. It only dates back to 250 years ago. It's current form was developed in the 18th century. Iranians say that Tar is the sultan of instruments. It is strongly believed that Tar is the descendent of rubab which is played in Pakistan and Afghanistan. After is has been adopted to Persian art by the musicians it became a common urban instrument. The long and narrow neck of Tar has a flat fingerboard which ends with six wooden pegs. It has three courses of double "singing" strings which lies on the fingerboard There are also two pairs of shorter strings which is under the bass and over two small copper bridges on the upper side of the fingerboard. Tuning of these strings are variable according to the performer's taste.The setar is a Persian (Iranian) stringed instrument with a small, pear-shaped soundbox and four metal strings. Its name means “three strings.” A fourth drone string was added about 150 years ago by the mystic Moshtagh Ali Shah. The drone string is referred to as the “Sim Moshtagh” (Moshtagh string) by many prominent tar and setar players. This modification gave the delicate instrument a “bigger” sound and more complex tuning possibilities. The resonating box of the setar is attached to a long neck that has twenty-five gut frets. The soundbox is made from mulberry wood, while the neck comes from the walnut tree. The instrument has a melodic range of just over twenty scale degrees. Although it is traditionally played with the right index finger’s nail, in the past three decades, two distinguished master performers, Mohammad-Reza Lotfi and Hossein Alizadeh, have introduced new techniques to give setar playing a whole new life. Tanbur has epic, mythical and mystical characteristics and it is often used to accompany the narration of epics. This instrument has traveled far and wide in time and space and it has taken on different names and shapes. The neck and body of Tanbur is one whole piece similar to Setar. Between 10 to 15 frets are placed on Tanbur. Iranian Tanbur has 4 strings and as mentioned before is played without a pick. Based on 3 statues found in the ruins of Shoosh, Tanbur can be dated back to 1500 B.C. Persian Tanbur travelled through Iran and Syria to Turkey and Greece and further west to Egypt. The Egyptian version has an elliptical body. It is known that Tanbur was widely used during the Sasanid dynasty and even before that. Today, Tanbur is used in mystical circles to accompany the Darvishes’ chants and mantras and is usually accompanied by Daf on such occasions.
Seyed Khalil Alinezhad was a great master of the spiritual instrument tanbur, recognized as one of the best tanbur players ever known. Seyed Khalil was born in a Kurdish family in a Sahneh County village in the Kermanshah Province, in western Iran. He started his tanbur lessons with Seyed Nader Taheri and followed his studies under supervisions of Seyed Amrollah Shah Ebrahimi, Dervish Amir Hayati, and Master Abedin Khademi. He finished his academic studies in the 1970s from University of Tehran with a thesis titled “Tanbur – from the very beginning till now”. During his lifetime he became known as a spiritual leader of the mystic religion Ahl-e Haqq (People of truth), a religious tradition related to Sufism, Shia Islam, and Alevi traditions.
The term Tanbur (Persian: تنبور, pronounced [t̪ʰænˈbuːɾ, t̪ʰæmˈbuːɾ])[a] can refer to various long-necked string instruments originating in Mesopotamia, Southern or Central Asia.According to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, "terminology presents a complicated situation. Nowadays the term tanbur (or tambur) is applied to a variety of distinct and related long-necked lutes used in art and folk traditions. Similar or identical instruments are also known by other terms." These instruments are used in the traditional music of Iran, India, Kurdistan, Armenia, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan (especially Avar community), Pakistan, Turkey, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan.Persian tar is a long necked, double-bowl body instrument. Persian Tar is a string or stringed instrument. It is the newest musical instrument of Persian folklor. It only dates back to 250 years ago. It's current form was developed in the 18th century. Iranians say that Tar is the sultan of instruments. It is strongly believed that Tar is the descendent of rubab which is played in Pakistan and Afghanistan. After is has been adopted to Persian art by the musicians it became a common urban instrument. The long and narrow neck of Tar has a flat fingerboard which ends with six wooden pegs. It has three courses of double "singing" strings which lies on the fingerboard There are also two pairs of shorter strings which is under the bass and over two small copper bridges on the upper side of the fingerboard. Tuning of these strings are variable according to the performer's taste.
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Weight 1.5 kg
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